Museums meet the needs of more diverse disabilities

I’m excited by the recent additions of more and more programs offered by cultural institutions to provide services to differing types of disabilities. For years, ADA has meant wheelchair accessibility, and that’s very important, but also important is meeting the needs of those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, those with visual impairments and other types of disabilities beyond providing a ramp into a building. Speaking from the perspective of a parent with a child with autism, I can tell you that my son benefits ENORMOUSLY from cultural institutions like libraries, museums, and concerts when he can manage the sensory issues. I’m happy to share that our local museum the Thinkery here in Austin has provided several days a year specifically geared to the needs of children with autism and other sensory issues. It’s a great way to enjoy things that typical families take for granted. We all want our kids to enjoy being kids. These community initiatives allow us as parents to help provide that. If you know of a good cultural program that benefits people with an intellectual or developmental disability in your city that you’d like to share, please feel free to add a comment and let us know about it.

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Navigating Life in Texas

I have been lucky enough to work on a project for the State of Texas’ Health and Human Services Commission to help launch (in a very small role in a huge major multi-year effort) a new website that will help parents with children with disabilities and special health care needs find their way to services. It’s called http://www.navigatelifeTexas.org and boy, is it a revelation. There is so many ways that parenting a child with special needs is confusing and this takes so much of the guess work out.

If you know anyone that parents a child with special needs, I encourage you to have them visit the site: http://www.navigatelifeTexas.org.